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D&D War Rules (Age of War Campaign Guide Supplement)

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D&D War Rules Edit

In the Age of War campaign setting, the world is on the verge of apocalyptic war, and already great armies meet in battle. For this reason, a Age of War campaign may erupt into war. Sadly, the Dungeons and Dragons rules do not cater for a battle on a large scale. Therefore, rules are needed to adapt the D&D rules to this exact situation. This chapter presents variant rules for battles on a larger scale than the small skirmishes the D&D rules are built for.

The D&D war rules work on various wargaming principals in order to allow battles in the D&D game. The rules that follow are, most likely, too detailed for playing without miniatures, so it is recommended that models are used when playing D&D war. You will also need a ruler or other measuring instrument that can measure in inches (a tape measure is best), movement trays to make moving large numbers of models around easier, a wide open space to play on, and, crucally, lots and lots of dice.

RulesEdit

UnitsEdit

To allow large battles to be fought in a reasonable space of time, large groups of minions (lead by a few more powerful creatures and characters) are grouped together into "units".

CompaniesEdit

File:Flank Arcs.JPG

A unit usually consists of one or more "companies". A company is a group of minions (no larger than large size) grouped into one space. No matter how many casualties a company suffers, it still fills the same space.

All models in a company are arranged facing one of the long edges; this defines the front of the company. The models in the company continue to face this direction for the duration of a battle—they cannot turn on the spot to face the side or rear. This is important as large blocks of warriors, unlike skirmishers and individuals, can be charged in the flank or rear. Each company therefore has a front arc, two flank arcs and a rear arc, as shown in the image below.

The direction the models in a company are facing in is deemed to be the direction in which the company is facing and can thus see. A company can only see things that are in its front arc. This is a 90° arc projected in the front of the unit, derived by drawing a line at a 45° angle from the corners of the company.

UnitsEdit

Rarely will a company be found alone on the battlefield. A number of companies of the same type ase grouped together to form a "unit". A unit can consist of any number of companies; from a single company to many. The number of companies in a unit is determined by the unit's characteristic profile. Companies in a unit are placed together and must remain together for the entire battle. Companies in the same unit are aranged in a straight line as shown in the diagram. Each company must be placed corner-to-corner with the next company in the unit. All companies in a unit must face in the same direction.

File:Units.JPG


Companies can also be placed in multiple "ranks" to make the formation deeper. Units can be arranged with as many ranks as you want, but ranks must be completed before the next rank can be placed. A company behind another must also be placed corner-to-corner, as shown in the diagram below.

File:Ranked Units.JPG


Different units are not allowed to touch unless they are engaged in close combat. Therefore, if two units come into contact with each other, they should be moved at least 1" (1 square) apart. A unit is not allowed to move within 1" of an enemy unit, except by charging.

In close combat, units are moved into "base-to-base" contact, which means that their bases or movement trays touch. This contact, unlike that of companies in the same formation, does not have to be corner to corner, as shown in the diagram below.

File:Units in Contact.JPG


MeasuringEdit

File:Measuring Distances.JPG

In a game of D&D war, a battle-grid is not used, as playing on a squared grid would reduce the realism of the maneuvre of massed formations and reduce the tactics of the game somewhat. Instead, for the purposes of movement, sooting, measuring reach, ansd so on, distances are measured in inches (with a ruler, tape measure or some other suitable instrument). When measiring, an inch is equivalent to 1 square on a battle-grid, so a model with a speed of 6 that uses a move action can move up to 6", and a power with a range of 20 has a range of 20".

When measuring the distance between two units (for the purposes of charging, shooting and similar), use the closest points between their movement trays as reference points (or bases, if they do not have movement trays), as shown in the diagram.

This convention is applied in a variety of different ways depending on the situation. This will be discussed in greater detail throughout the rules.

Bursts and BlastsEdit

Bursts are measured from a central point outwards. This central point is always a base—for close bursts, the area of the burst is a number of inches outwards from the edge of the base equal to the creature that used the burst. In the case of area bursts, place a 1" circular base at the point at which you want the area burst to be centered, and measure a number of inches outwards from the base, as above. You can (and probably should, for simplicity) use the base of a medium-sized creature as the center of the burst.

Blasts are always measured from a single point on the edge of the user's base. Simply measure a 90° arc from a single point of the users base that is a number of inches in diameter equal to the blast's area.

Some bursts and blasts create areas of effect. To mark the locations of these, simply place a base in the center of the burst or blast and measure outwards (half the range in the case of blasts). If an area of effect attacks or damages a unit that enters the burst or blast, calculate the number of models in the unit that are covered by the area once in their move so that as many models are covered by the area as possible.

CharacteristicsEdit

In the game of D&D war, a model's characteristics are used to show the effectiveness of the model. The stat line used is a condensed form of the stat blocks used in normal games of D&D, with redundant stats (such as skill checks) removed.

Size: A creature's size determines the size of base used for lone creatures and characters, or the size of movement tray used to represent the creatures space.

Origin and Type: These are defined in the D&D core rulebooks.

Speed (S): This shows how far a creature can move with a single move action, in inches.

Initiative (I): Initiative is used to determine the order in which creatures fight in close combat. It is also used to determine which model acts first when opposing heroic actions are called.

Hit Points (Hp): This shows how much damage a creature can take before it is slain. A score of 1/- shows that the creature is a minion (even if it also has action points).

Resilience (R): This indicates how many hits a minion model can suffer in a round before it is removed as a casualty. Non-minion models never have a resilience higher than 1.

Attacks (A): This shows the number of attacks a model can make against minions when it takes a multiple attack action. Models with an attack score of 1 cannot take a multiple attack action.

Armor Class, Fortitude, Reflex and Will (AC/F/R/W): This shows the model's defences.

Action Points (AP): This shows the number of action points the model can use throughout the battle. A creature with action points is said to be a "character", even if that creature is also a minion (a category that includes unit captains.

Unit Size: This tells you the maximum and minimum size of a unit.

Wargear: This is a term that covers all equipment that a model might carry. This tells you the equipment that a model carries.

Command: Some units have command options that represent the unit's leaders&mdashsuch as captains, musicians and banners. These are all covered in greater detail later.

Special rules: Some model also have special rules. These are shown here.

Powers: Every model has powers that it can use in battle, from simple sword strikes to complex spells. These are shown here.

The TurnEdit

Just like in the standard D&D rules, a battle is separated into rounds. However, the D&D war rules change the round sequence into a more structured format. Rounds are also referred to as "turns", as creatures do not take turns of their own.

The Turn SequenceEdit

During each turn, both sides move and fight in the order given below. This is called the “turn sequence” or “round sequence”. Each part of the turn sequence is called a “phase”.

PHASEEdit
  1. Initiative: Both sides roll a d20 to determine which side has the initiative that turn.
  2. Movement: Both sides move their units, creatures and characters. Once the side with the initiative has moved, the other side moves.
  3. Shooting: Both sides use ranged, area and burst powers. The side with the initiative uses their powers first, and then the other side uses their powers.
  4. Charge: Both sides can charge. The side with the initiative charges first, and then the other side charges.
  5. Close Combat: Close combat is resolved. The side with the initiative chooses the order combats are resolved.
  6. End of Turn: The turn is over. Begin another turn with the initiative phase.

The Initiative PhaseEdit

Roll OffsEdit

If the rules require both sides to roll off, that means each side rolls a d20, adds any modifiers stated, and compares results. The side that has the highest result wins the roll off, and usually gains some favorable benefit. If the result is a draw, the roll of is repeated with the same modifiers.

In the initiative phase, both sides make an opposed d20 roll to determine which side has the initiative that turn. Usually, no modifiers are added to these rolls, though if a power provides a power bonus or penalty to initiative checks to the army's general, that bonus or penalty is also added to this d20 roll. If the result is a draw, both sides roll off until one side wins (with the same modifiers).

Whichever side wins the opposed d20 roll can choose which side has the initiative that turn. Having the initiative can be really important to an army’s strategy, as it allows them to move and shoot first, though sometimes it is advantageous to be able to react to your foe’s moves.

The Movement PhaseEdit

After the initiative phase is the move phase. In the movement phase, both sides manoeuvre their units. The movement phase is the most important phase, as the events of the movement phase generally dictate which side wins.

In the movement phase, the side with the initiative moves all of its units first, and then the other side moves all of its units. After both sides have moved, the game moves on to the shooting phase.

The Movement PhaseEdit
  1. The side with the initiative goes first.
    1. Rally Fleeing Units: If any units are fleeing, you can attempt to rally them.
    2. Compulsory Moves: Move units subject to compulsory movement (such as fleeing units).
    3. Remaining Moves: Move the rest of your units.
  2. The other side moves its units, using the same procedure as above.

1. Rally Fleeing UnitsEdit

Fall Back! MovesEdit

  • Double Move Action: A fall back! move uses two move action, like a double move. A unit that has made a fall back! move is treated as running.
  • The Enemy is Upon Us!: A fall back! move is not affected by enemies within 6", like a double move usually is.
  • Random Flee Distance: A unit making a fall back action moves a number of inches equal to 2d6 plus double its speed minus 12. This moves is affected by terrain as normal.
  • Flee Direction: A unit making a fall back! action flees towards the nearest board edge, regardless of nearby foes. A unit that moves off the board edge in this way is removed as a casualty.
  • You Cannot Pass!: A unit that flees into an enemy unit is destroyed.
  • Panic: A fleeing unit can move through allies—but if it does so, the allied unit must pass a courage test of DC 13 or make a fall back! move in the same direction.
  • Rally: A fleeing unit continues to flee until it rallies.

If any of your units are fleeing, you can attempt to rally them. Rallying a unit does not use any actions.

To rally a unit, take a courage test of DC 13 (see courage tests, below). If the test is passed, the unit must immediatly take a reform action (see below). If the test is failed, the unit continues to flee. It must make a fall back! action as a compulory move.

2. Compulory MovesEdit

After fleeing units have been rallied (or have failed to rally), units suffering from compulsory moves must be moved. Compulsory movements are special movements that force a unit to move—such as fall back! moves.

Compulsory movement should not be confused with forced movement, which is resolved immediately. Compulsory moves do not include pulls, pushes and slides, and are treated as normal movement for all intents and purposes. Compulsory moves only cover fall back! moves and other movements like frenzy.

Fleeing units that failed to rally earlier in the move phase must make fall back! moves in this part of the move phase, whether you want them to or not!

Compulsory moves can be moved in any order you wish&mdsh; though fall back! moves must be made in such an order so that fleeing units do not get in each other's way.

3. Remaining MovesEdit

Each side can move any and all of its units in any order. A unit can walk as a move action, moving a number of inches equal to its speed. The unit uses the slowest speed of all of the members of the unit for this purpose. A unit does not have to move the maximum distance allowed, but they cannot move further than their speed in this way, except by using a double move, or (in the case of skirmishers and lone models) by running. The companies in a unit must stick together at all times.

In the case of units made up of companies, manoeuvres are limited. Such a unit can only move directly forwards or diagonally at up to a 45°, so long as the unit begins and ends the move in the same direction. If a unit wishes to turn, it must wheel, pivot or reform.

File:Wheeling.JPG

A unit can turn by pivoting around one of the front two corners of its unit, like a spoke swinging round a wheel (see diagram). When a unit wheels, it counts as moving as far as the outermost corner of unit moved during the wheel. The unit can only wheel forwards.

Moving multiple companies at once by wheeling is quite difficult. You can, however, simply move the company that moves furthest the maximum distance you intend to move it, and move the other companies in the unit into place next to (and behind) it.

An entire formation can also turn through 90° or 180° by giving up some of it's movement distance- a unit can spemd one quater of its move speed (rounding up) to pivot up to 90° round the centre of the unit. It can instead spend half of its move (rounding up) to pivot up to 180° around the centre of the unit. The unit cannot do this if it runs or takes a double move action.

Finally, a unit can completely reform by taking a 'reform action'. This uses a move action, the unit cannot move. Instead, it can completely rearrange the postition of all it's companies and turn to face in any direction. A unit making a reform cannot act in the shooting phase, though characters that have joined a unit may still act in the shooting phase.

As a unit moves forwards, you can rearrange it's companies as you wish, so long as the arrangement is legal. This is different from a reform action because the unit cannot turn while it rearranges—the unit must end facing the same direction when it reforms in this way. A unit may, however, wheel and turn before or after it reforms in this way, as normal.

Double MoveEdit

A unit can expend take a double move action; this uses two move actions. When a unit uses a double move, it doubles its speed, as normal. The same movement rules apply to double moves as for normal movement. Hovever, if there are enemies within 6" of a unit, that unit cannot take a double move action; the warriors in the unit are too buisy preparing for the imminent battle to move faster.

RunEdit

A unit made up of companies cannot take a run action. This represents the fact that the tight formation of warriors prevents freedom of movement. This rule does not, however, apply to other units—characters, monsters and skirmishers can run.

CrawlEdit

If a member of a unit is prone, the unit will only be able to move at the speed of the crawling warrior until that warrior stands up. A warrior in a company may, however, stand up as a minor action. This represents one of the warrior's fellows giving the warrior a hand up. This rule does not apply if the unit is engaged in close combat—the nearby warriors are too buisy fighting to help a fallen comrad.

Difficult TerrainEdit

All distances moved over difficult terrain count as double the distance actually moved. A model that has a speed of 6 therefore moves only 3" over difficult terrain. If a unit has an odd number of inches left to move into, or through, difficult terrain, it may move half an inch. For example, a unit with a speed of 6 that moves 3" to reach an area of difficult terrain can move up to 1 1/2" into difficult terrain.

The Shooting PhaseEdit

After the movement phase is the shooting phase. In the shooting phase, all ranged and area attacks are resolved. This includes powers such as a wizard's spells that attack a foe at range. Close attacks are not resolved until the close combat phase.

As in the movement phase, the side with the initiative goes first, and the other side resolves its shooting second.

The Shooting PhaseEdit
  1. The side with the initiative shoots first.
    1. Choose unit to shoot.
    2. Choose target.
    3. Roll to hit.
    4. Remove Casualties
    5. Repeat steps 1-4 with every other formation you wish to fire.
    6. The other side makes any panic tests requied.
  2. The other side shoots with its units, using the same procedure as above.

1. Choose Unit to ShootEdit

First, you must choose a unit with ranged or area attacks to resolve. A unit must spend the action required by the power they use to shoot, even if only some members of the unit are firing. You must then choose the power that is used—all members of the unit must use the same power and expend the action required. For example, if a unit of goblin archers fires their shortbows, they must all spend a standard action, even if only four of them actually shoot.

This rule does not apply to characters that have joined a unit. See the section on characters for details.

2. Choose TargetEdit

A unit can shoot at any enemy unit within range, so long as at least part of the unit lies within it's arc of sight (see diagram) and can be seen by the unit. All members of the unit must target the same unit. If the target is in the arc of sight of at least one company in the unit, all companies in the unit can fire.

File:Arc of Sight.JPG


The unit must have line of sight to the target. To see if a company has line of sight to the target, draw an imaginary line from any point in the company to any company in the target unit or any individual model in the unit in the case of skirmishers. If anything blocks the line, the company cannot see the target unit, and thus cannot fire.

3. Roll to HitEdit

Multiattack: Standard ActionEdit

  • Part of an Attack: A model can yake a multiattack action instead of attacking normally. This is an exception to the rule that models in a unit must all take the same attack action.
  • Melee or Ranged Attack: A multiattack action can be used to make a single at-will melee or ranged attack power multiple times. The power chosen must not have any areas of effect or create any zones.
  • Multiple Attacks: The model may use the power a number of times equal to the number of attacks (A) on its profile.
  • Power Effects: If the power has any special effects (such as Cleave and Priest's Shield), these only occur on the first attack made. If the power grants multiple attacks (such as Twin Strike and Amalgamated Assault, these extra attacks occur only on the first attack made.

Firstly, you must calculate the number of dice the unit rolls to hit. Only companies that have line of sight can shoot. Those that cannot see cannot contribute any dice to the shooting. Only models in the front row (not the front company) can shoot—unless the power you use states otherwise, or they have multiple attacks on their profile, each creature in the front row of the companies that can see contributes a single dice. If the unit is on a higher elevation than the target, the front two rows can contribute dice in this way. Models with more than 1 attack (A) on their profile can take a multiattack action to shoot multiple times.

For example: A unit of elf archers (armed with longbows) is shooting at a unit of drow skirmishers. The elf archer unit consists of one full company and one at half strength, and is on a hill. The unit has a captain (2 attacks). Each ordinary elf makes 1 attack, so the front row makes 7 attacks. The unit is on a higher elevation than the drow (a hill), so the second ro can also shoot. The four elves in the second row make 4 attacks, making a total of 11. The captain makes a multiattack action, and contributes 2 dice for a total of 13.

Next, the dice score needed to hit to be calculated. First, you must check to see if the target unit has cover concealment against the shooting unit. Draw an imaginary line from the center of each company to the center of each company. If the majority of the lines pass through an object or area that grants cover or concealment, the target gains the benefit of that cover or concealment. In the case of multiple covers and concealment, calculate whether the target benefits from them as a whole, then grant the highest bonus. Once cover and concealment have been checked, you must subtract the attack bonus of the attack from the target's AC. In the case of multiple attack bonuses, the dice roll needed must be calculated seperately. In the case of different AC's, the majority AC is used, but only targets with an AC equal to or lower than the majority AC can be hit. The to hit chart shown can be used to quickly calculate the scores to hit required.

To Hit Chart
Edit

Target's AC
File:Attack Bonus.JPG 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
+1 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+ 15+ 16+ 17+ 18+ 19+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+
+2 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+ 15+ 16+ 17+ 18+ 19+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+
+3 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+ 15+ 16+ 17+ 18+ 19+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+
+4 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+ 15+ 16+ 17+ 18+ 19+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+
+5 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+ 15+ 16+ 17+ 18+ 19+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+
+6 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+ 15+ 16+ 17+ 18+ 19+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+
+7 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+ 15+ 16+ 17+ 18+ 19+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+
+8 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+ 15+ 16+ 17+ 18+ 19+ 20+ 20+ 20+
+9 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+ 15+ 16+ 17+ 18+ 19+ 20+ 20+
+10 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+ 15+ 16+ 17+ 18+ 19+ 20+
+11 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+ 15+ 16+ 17+ 18+ 19+
+12 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+ 15+ 16+ 17+ 18+
+13 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+ 15+ 16+ 17+
+14 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+ 15+ 16+
+15 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+ 15+
+16 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+
+17 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+
+18 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+
+19 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+
+20 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+


Roll a number of d20's equal to the number of attacks made by the unit. Every dice that rolls equal to or more than the target score to hit causes a hit on the unit. Rolls of less than 8 automatically miss, regardless of the actual score required to hit.

Continuing the example, the elves must now roll to hit. The target unit is not found to have cover or concealment, so the units base AC is used. It's AC is 25, and the elves' attack bonus is +16. 25-16 is 9, so the elves need to roll higher than 9 to hit. The elves roll 3, 6, 8, 8, 9, 9, 9, 10, 11, 11, 13, 15, 19, and so hit 9 times.

4. Remove CasualtiesEdit

Hope is Lost!Edit

When the final company in a unit (usually the command company) is reduced to half strength or below, the company is removed as a casualty— these count towards combat resolution in close combat. This represents the final members of the unit fleeing in terror as their allies are destroyed.

If the unit has a resillience score of 1, one minion in the unit is removed as a casualty for every hit caused. If the majority of the unit has a resillience score of 2 or higher, the number of hits must be distributed. The hits must be distributed in such a way as to remove as many minions as possible—excess hits are discounted. A minion must suffer hits equal to its resillience score to be slain.

Continuing the example, the elves hit 9 times, so 9 minions are removed from the unit.

For example: If a unit of giant spiders (resillience 2) is hit 7 times, 3 minions are removed from the unit. The last hit is discounted.

Casualties must be removed from companies in the following order: First, casualties must be removed from the depleted company. Then the casualties must be removed from the rearmost company. Casualties are never removed from the command company, unless it is the last company remaining.

If any models in the unit suffer from any conditions (such as slowed), the entire unit is assumed to suffer from the conditions. In the case of effects that last until a save is made, make a single saving throw for the entire unit, using the highest possible saving throw bonus. In the case of ongoing damage, only a single model in the unit takes the damage. The damage must be applied to a single rank-and file model in the unit if possible. The ongoing damage causes a single hit (in the case of minions with a resilience of 2 or more, instead reduce the resilience of the chosen minion by 1 point until the end of the turn—the chonen minion must take damage before all other members of the unit if possible until the end of the turn).

6. Panic TestsEdit

Every company that suffered a number of casualties equal to or more than the number of models in a full company (for that particular unit) must make a courage test or flee (see below). In the case of skirmishing units, the number of models in a full company is assumed to be 4 (representing the smaller size of skirmishing unitis).

The Charge PhaseEdit

The Chage PhaseEdit
  1. The side with the initiative charges first.
    1. Declare Charges: Declare the units that will charge and what they will charge.
    2. Roll Charge Distance: Roll 1d6 and add the relevant modifier to determine how far the unit charges.
    3. Choose Spearhead: Chose one company or model in the unit that will spearhead the charge.
    4. Move Spearhead: Move the spearhead into contact with the target unit.
    5. Move Unit: Move the rest of the unit with the spearhead.
    6. Resolve Attacks: Resolve the attacks made as part of the charge.
  2. The other side charges with its units, using the same procedure as above.

1. Declare ChargesEdit

Before your units can charge, you must delclare the units that will charge and the targets that they will charge. You can measure before you declare the charges that you intend to make, but if the target unit is too far away to charge, the charge will not be made, leaving the unit vulnerable to a countercharge. It is also worth bearing in mind that charges from further than 2" away are more effective. A unit can only declare a charge against a unit it can see.

2. Roll Charge DistanceEdit

The distance which each unit charges is randomised. This prevents charges from being a forgone conclusion and brings in an element of uncertinity. For each unit that has declared a charge, you must roll 1d6. A roll of a 1 indicates a failed charge—a unit that rolls a 1 cannot charge, even if the target unit is only 1" away. A roll of a 6 indicates an "unstopable charge". This is delt with later, though it is best to leave a marker as a reminder. To see if the charge was successful, number determined by the table below is added to the d6 roll. The result is how far the unit can charge.

Unit's Speed Charge Distance
3 1d6 + 0
4 1d6 + 1
5 1d6 + 2
6 1d6 + 3
7 1d6 + 4
8 1d6 + 5
+1 +1

3. Choose SpearheadEdit

You must choose a single company in each unit that rolled a 2 or higher to spearhead the charge. In the case of skirmishers, a single model must be chosen. The spearhead is the first part of the unit to charge, and if it is out of range, the charge fails. You can measure before you choose your spearhead, so you don't need to worry about choosing a spearhead that is out of range.

4. Move SpearheadEdit

You must now move each spearhead you chose into contact with the target unit. First, check to see if it is in range. The spearhead can move up to the distance you rolled for the unit's charge distance to charge—if the target unit is too far away, the spearhead cannot charge and the charge is failed—this does not expend any actions. If the spearhead is in range, move the spearhead into base-to-base contact with the target, even if the charging unit has a reach of 2 or greater.

You must move the spearhead into chontact with the flank arc that faces it. To see which arc faces it, draw imaginary lines from the corners of the target unit at a 45° angle, as shown on the diagram. The flank arc that the majority of the spearhead is in is the one that it must charge.

5. Move UnitEdit

Now you must move the rest of the unit to form up around the spearhead. You may change the arrangement of the companies in the unit if you wish, so long as no company moves more than the distance you rolled for its charge distance. This can be useful to get more companies into contact with the enemy, granting you more attacks.

6. Resolve AttacksEdit

When a unit charges, it immediately resolves its attacks in the charge phase, rather than in the close combat phase. This enables the charging unit to take down foes before they can strike back, regardless of initiative. The charging attacks are resolved in the same way as attacks in the close combat phase are (see below). Not that attacks made now are treated as being resolved at a higher initiative order for the purpose of return attacks and combat resolution. This means that foes struck down now do not strike back in the close combat phase, and that attacks made now count towards combat resolution. Attacks made by units that charged more than 2" gain a +1 bonus to attack rolls. Companies that charge further than 2" can also make an extra 1d3 attacks per company. In the case of cavalry companies, 1d6 is rolled insteasd of 1d3.


The Close Combat PhaseEdit

The Close Combat PhaseEdit
  1. The side with the initiative picks a fight to resolve.
    1. Fight Combat: Resolve attacks from all units in the fight.
    2. Combat Resolution: Work out which side has won the combat and by how much.
    3. Break Test: Each unit in the loosing side must take a break test or flee.
    4. Flee and Persue: Units that failed the break test must flee. The winmning side can persue the fleeing units.
  2. The side with the initiative picks another fight to resolve, as above, until there are no more fights to resolve.

1. Fight CombatEdit

Who Can Fight?Edit

Models can fight if their base is within a number of inches equal to their reach of at least one enemy, so an elf (reach 1) must be within 1" of an enemy to be able to fight. If a company is not in base-to-base contact with an enemy, it cannot fight, and if a unit is not in base-to-base contact with an enemy, it cannot fight.

Who Strikes First?Edit

Models fight in "initiative order". Combatants with the highest initiative bonus (I) strike first, and combatants with the lowest initiative bonus strike last. Note that combatants that have charged (their attacks have already be resolved), and combatants that shot in the shooting phase have already used up their standard action, and cannot attack. Units must spend a standard acion to attack an enemy in close combat.

Hitting the EnemyEdit

Hitting the enemy in close combat uses the same procedure as shooting does, exept that only a model with an enemy within reach can attack, as explained above. As before, roll a number of d20's equal to the number of attacks made by the unit. Every dice that rolls equal to or more than the target score to hit causes a hit on the unit. Rolls of less than 8 automatically miss, regardless of the actual score required to hit. It is worth noting that the only form of cover that applies in close combat is a physical barrier, such as a wall.

To Hit Chart
Edit

Target's AC
File:Attack Bonus.JPG 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
+1 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+ 15+ 16+ 17+ 18+ 19+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+
+2 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+ 15+ 16+ 17+ 18+ 19+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+
+3 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+ 15+ 16+ 17+ 18+ 19+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+
+4 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+ 15+ 16+ 17+ 18+ 19+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+
+5 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+ 15+ 16+ 17+ 18+ 19+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+
+6 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+ 15+ 16+ 17+ 18+ 19+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+
+7 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+ 15+ 16+ 17+ 18+ 19+ 20+ 20+ 20+ 20+
+8 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+ 15+ 16+ 17+ 18+ 19+ 20+ 20+ 20+
+9 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+ 15+ 16+ 17+ 18+ 19+ 20+ 20+
+10 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+ 15+ 16+ 17+ 18+ 19+ 20+
+11 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+ 15+ 16+ 17+ 18+ 19+
+12 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+ 15+ 16+ 17+ 18+
+13 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+ 15+ 16+ 17+
+14 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+ 15+ 16+
+15 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+ 15+
+16 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+ 14+
+17 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+ 13+
+18 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+ 12+
+19 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 11+
+20 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 9+ 10+


Remove CasualtiesEdit

Casualties are removed in the same way as with shooting. However, in close combat, casualties are assumed to be removed from the front of the unit (or wherever the attacks are coming from, whether the front or the side), with models moving forwards to replace fallen allies. Models that move forwards in this way cannot attack later in the close combat phase. This also applies to casuaties caused by a charging unit!

If a unit finds itself unengaged from the battle, due to the removal of enemies, it must immediately move the shortest distance possible to re-engage with enemies involved in the close combat it was involved in.

2. Combat ResolutionEdit

Very rarely is a combat fought to the last. More often, it is fought until one side looses its courage and flees. Therefore, at the end of each round of close combat, you must calculate which side wins the combat and by how much. If one side is anhialated, the other side automatically wins the combat.

Each side scores a number of points equal to the number of hits it caused in close combat. If a hit caused multiple die of damage, the hit is worth a number of points equal to the number of damage die. In the case of weapons, such as a maul, that causes multiple die of damage only grants 1 point per 1[W] of damage.

In addition, each side gains a number of conditional bonuses to combat resolution, as shown below. These bonuses are added to the number of hits caused to determine both sides combat result. The side wuth the highest score wins the fight. If both sides have the same score, then the fight is a draw. If one side lost, it must take a break test (see below). The differemce between scores should then be calculated for the purpose of break tests.

Combat Resolution Bonuses
Edit

This section describes all of the modifiers for combat resolution. Most of these bonuses apply for conditions at the end of the battle. The exception is the bonus for supporting companies, for which the number of supporting companies at the start of the current round of combat is used.

Supporting CompaniesEdit

At the start of each round of combat, each company with less than half of the models in its front row engaged in combat can choose to support instead of fighting, unless more than half of the models in the company have been killed. Each company that supports in this way grants a +2 bonus to combat resolution, to a maximum of +14. If you have multiple units in a single combat, count only the highest bonus. This represents the pushing force of a large mass of bodies forcing your foes back.

Outnumber EnemyEdit

If the combined unit strength of all your units is higher than the total unit strength of all opposing units in the combat, you gain a +2 bonus to combat resolution. This represents the not inconsiderable benefit of overwhealming numbers.

StandardEdit

If at least one of your units has a standard bearer, you gain a +2 bonus to combat resolution. This bonus is not cumulative, but becomes a +4 bonus if one of the stanard bearers bears the army's battle standard. This represents the morale bonus of having an inspiring insignia flying above the combat.

High GroundEdit

Traditionally, fighting from higher ground provides the tactical advantage. The side with the unit on the highest ground gains a +2 bonus to combat resolution.

Flank AttackEdit

Charging an enemy from an unexpected angle can be lethal, giving a huge advantage in the battle. If you are fighting against an enemy unit's flank, you gain a +2 bonus to combat resolution. This bonus only applies once, even if you are fighting against both flanks. If you are fighting against your opponent's rear, you instead gain a +4 bonus. This bonus stacks with the flank attack bonus, so if you are fighting against both your opponent's flank and rear, you gain a +6 bonus.

OverkillEdit

Seing a mighty hero cut to pieces by one of your heroes strikes fear into the hearts of your foes. If a character is fighting in a challenge, and hits more than enough times to kill his foe, his side gains a +1 bonus for each excess hit caused, up to a maximum of +5.


3. Break TestEdit

Each unit on the loosing side must now make a courage test or flee. The DC of the courage test is equal to 10 + the amout they lost the combat by (determined by combat resolution). If the test is passed, the unit remains in combat. It has overcome it's fears and remains steadifast! Units that fail will flee, the cowards!

4. Flee and PersueEdit

Each unit on the loosing side that failed its courage test must make a fall back! move directly away from the unit(s) it was fighting. If a unit on the other side becomes disengaged due to fleeing foes, it can attempt to persue any unit that fled from the combat. The unit pivots on the spot to face the unit it chose to persue, and moves a number of inches equal to 2d6 plus double its speed minus 12 in the direction of the fleeing unit. This moves is affected by terrain as normal. If the unit reaches the unit it persues, or reaches another enemy unit, it automatically charges that unit, though the charge attacks and return attacks are not resolved until next turn.

PsychologyEdit

In battle, a warrior's courage is tested to the very limit. Warriors cower in the face of terrifying foes such as dragons, and flee when outnumbered in close combat. This section explains how this is represented in the game of D&D war, and has rules for fear, terror and the like.

Courage TestsEdit

sometimes, a unit will have to take a "courage test" to prevent itself from fleeing. All courage tests follow the same basic procedure; a d20 is rolled, much like a skill check (except that one half of the creature's level is not added), and various modifiers are added, as shown on the tables below. When taking a courage test, always use the highest possible bonus.

Racial Bonuses
Race Bonus
Goblins, Kobolds +1
Orcs, Humans, Halflings +3
Dwarves, Dragonborn +5
Elves, Drow, Half-Elves +6
Size Bonuses
Size Bonus
Small; Medium +0
Large +2
Huge +4
Gargantuan +8
Other Bonuses
Condition Bonus
Musician +1
Tier Bonus (Characters Only) +1 per Tier
Stalwart +2
Bard, Songweaver +2

For example; A unit of human warriors with a musician has a +3 racial bonus to courage tests, and a +1 bonus for having a musician; for a total of +4. If an 8th-level elf fighter joins the unit, they instead use the elf's +7 bonus (+6 racial and +1 tier, as the elf is a character); with a +1 bonus fro, the musician, for a total of +8.

The bonuses for having a musician, being stalwart and having a bard or songweaver in the unit always applies, regardless of who's bonus is used. The tier bonus for being a character of a particular tier only applies to the character's courage check bonus. If, for example, a 6th-level hu,an fighter joins a unit of elves, the elves' +6 racial bonus applies, without the fighter's tier bonus, rather than the fighter's +4 (+3 racial, +1 tier).

Panic TestsEdit

A panic test is an ordinary courage test. In the following situations, a unit may be required to take a panic test:

  1. It suffers a number of casualties from shooting equal to or more than the maximum number of models in a single company (skirmishers treat this as 4 casualties).
  2. Unit destroyed within 6".
  3. Allies flee from close combat within 6"
  4. Allied unit flees through unit.

Note that panic tests are only taken once per unit per phase, regardless of however many panic-causing events occur. The base DC for panic tests is 13 (except for panic tests caused by shooting casualties, which has a base DC of 10), with the modifiers shown below:

Panic Test DC Modifiers
Condition Modifier
Company worth of casualties (shooting only) +2 per company
Allied company fleeing within 6" +2 per company beyond the first
Enemy unit of higher unit strength within 6" +2

If the unit fails, it will make a fall back! move directly away from the cause of the panic test. In the case of panic tests caused from shooting, the unit will flee directly away from the unit that caused the panic.

Fear and TerrorEdit

Some units are also so scary that their mere presence causes mass hysteria and panic. These units have either the fear or the terror special rule. In addition to the situations above, units must also make a courage test if the following occurs:

  1. The unit is charged by a fear or terror causing enemy.
  2. The unit wishes to charge a fear or terror causing enemy.
  3. There is a terror causing unit within 6" of the unit at the start of the turn.

The DC of the courage test is 13 for a courage test caused by a fear-causing enemy, and 16 for a test caused by a terror-causing enemy. If the test is failed, the unit will immediately make a fall back! move directly away from the fear or terror causing enemy. However, if a unit wishes to charge a fear or terror causing enemy and fails the required courage test, the unit will not flee, it will simply not charge, as if it rolled a 1 for its charge distance.

If a unit is defeated in combat by a fear or terror causing enemy, the DC of the break test that the unit must takes is increased by 2 if the enemy causes fear and 4 if the enemy causes terror. If, however, the fear or terror causing enemy has a higher unit strength than the unit taking the break test, the unit must roll a natural 20 to pass the break test—any other roll is an automatic failure.

Fearless, Immune to Psychology and StubbornEdit

Some units are fearless. Such units automatically pass any courage tests they are required to make, regardless of what caused the courage test. In addition, fearless units also have the to the last man! special rule, and therefore are immune to the hope is lost! rule.

Other units are not quite as fearless as those who know no fear, but are nethertheless courageous beyond measure. Units with the immune to psychology special rule automatically pass panic, fear and terror tests, but must take break tests as normal. Units with the stubborn special rule do not apply panic test DC modifiers to the DCs of any panic tests they are required to make. Panic tests that are caused by shooting have a DC of 12 when taken by a stubborn unit.

Unit TypesEdit

There are a variety of different types of unit, with different rules to represent their strengths and weaknesses. These rules are described below.

InfantryEdit

Infantry makes up the mainstream of most armies, and are usually small or medium-sized creatures orgainsed into companies of eight. Infantry units have no special rules— the rules assume that units are infantry and differenciates other unit types with special rules.

CavalryEdit

Calvalry are some of the most dangerous and useful units on the battlefield. Cavalry units consist of warriors mounted on horses or some other kind of mount, and are usually made up of companies of two. Cavalry models are treated as a single model rather than how they usually are in the core Dungeons & Dragons rules, and usually have a resillience of 2. Cavalry units gain 1d6 additional attacks on the charge rather than 1d3.

War MachinesEdit

War machines are huge engines that launch massive projectiles into enemy units, causing devastation to the enemy's ranks. War machines have more complex rules than other types of units, and are described in detail later.

MonstersEdit

In the game of D&D war, the term "monster" always refers to a specific unit type. Monsters that form companies are treated as infantry, and monsters that form units of skirmishers are treated as skimishers. In addition, all monsters have a unit strength 1 higher than normal—this is for each individual monster in the unit, not the unit as a whole. Monsters are much more stoic than other puny creatures, and are thus immune to the hope is lost! rule.

The following rules assume that the monster is on its own—the last monster in the unit will revert to these rules. These rules also apply to characters riding monsters. Monsters do not have flank arcs, and thus cannot be flanked, and can see (and thus charge and shoot) in all directions. Monsters can also make a single change in direction when charging.

When using ranged attacks against characters riding monsters, roll 1d6 for every attack made. On the roll of a 1-4, the ranged attack must be made against the monster. On a 5-6 the attack must be made against the character. Area attacks against ridden monsters hit both the monster and the charactert once each.

For the purposes of combat resolution, monsters cannot gain the benefits of supporting companies, and units fighting against monsters cannot gain the benefits of supporting companies (this rule ceases to apply for units fighting against both units made up of companies as well as monsters).

SkirmishersEdit

Skimisher units form a loose group of individuals—modelsa in a skirmishing unit does not form companies. Instead, the models must remain within 2" of each other at all times, but are otherwise moved as individual models. Skimishers can, like monsters, see in all directions and therefore charge and shoot in all directions. Skirmishers, like monsters, can also make a single change in direction when charging.

Skirmishers can shoot in any direction and do not block the line of sight for other members of the same unit. Skimishers must each test for line of sight and effect as if each model was a company.

When charging, choose a single spearhead model, and charge as normal. The remaining models in the unit must move into the same charge arc, and as many models as possible must move into base-to base contact. Models that cannot move into base-to-base contact must move as close as possible to the target of the charge, and all models in the unit must end the charge within 2" of each other. When charged, skirmishing units will move up to their move speed in inches to get as many models as possible into base-to-base contact with the front arc of the charging unit.

In close combat, skirmishers cannot be flanked (though they can still flank enemy units. Only skimishers in base-to-base contant with an enemy can attack. For the purposes of combat resolution, skirmishers cannot gain the benefits of supporting companies, and units fighting against skirmishing units cannot gain the benefits of supporting companies (this rule ceases to apply for units fighting against both units made up of companies as well as skirmishing units). At the end of each round of combat, after break tests and fall back! moves, if they are still in close combat, skirmishing units will move up to their move speed in inches to get as many models as possible into base-to-base contact with the arc of the enemy unit that they charged (or the front arc, if they were charged).

CharactersEdit

Characters are great heroes that can fight alone or lead allied units into battle. Characters have more complex rules than other types of units and are therefore described in greater detail later.

Command CompaniesEdit

An army is normally lead to war by captains and under the banners of its homeland to the beat of drums. Many units therefore have command companies. Command companies often contain captains, banner bearers and musicians, and occasionally lesser spellcasters that lend their magic to the battle. In skimisher units, the term "command company" is not used, but the captain, banner bearer and musician (if present) are essentially the same thing.

Command companies are always placed in the center of the front rank of their units. If they end up elswere because of maneuvering, move the company to the center-front. The command models in the command company must be placed in the front row of the company. If thery do not fit, the excess models must be placed in another company (which is also positioned at the front of the unit.

The command company is always the last company to take casualties. Note that if any command models have been placed in other companies, they may be placed in the back row of the command company if it is the only company remaining in the unit. If a command model is lost, any benefits it conferred are lost.

Captains/ChieftainsEdit

Captains and chieftains are treated as characters that have joined the unit, except that they cannot leave the unit and are subject to the hope is lost! rule.

Standard BearersEdit

Standard bearers carry the unit's standard—essentially a large flag that bears a special design or incal that has some significance for the unit. A banner bearer grants the unit a +2 bonus to combat resolution. Standard bearers are never removed as a casualty while normal models remain in the unit—another model in the unit is assumed to take up the fallen standard and take up a position at the front of the unit.

Battle StandardsEdit

A battle standard is a special standard that is usually carried into battle by a character. battle standards are treated as normal standards, except that the bonus to combat resolution is +4 rather than +2. In addition, every allied unit within 12" is may re-roll courage tests (the re-roll cannot be re-rolled and must be accepted, even if the result is worse). If the bearer of a battle standard is slain, the battle standard is lost.

MusiciansEdit

Musicians, like standard bearers inspire the unit to greater acts of valour. Units with a musician gain a +1 bonus to all courage checks. In addition, if a round of combat ends in a draw and only one side has muscicians, that side wins the combat by 1 point. Muscians are never removed as a casualty while normal models remain in the unit—another model in the unit is assumed to take up the fallen musical instrument and take up a position at the front of the unit.

Unit StrengthEdit

Sometimes, the rules require the unit strength of units to be calculated. Unit strength represents the relative size of a unit, and takes the size of the members of the unit into account as well as the number of members in a unit. The unit strength of a unit is the sum total of the unit strengths of each member of the unit. Note that in the case of cavalry models, count only the unit strength of the mount, not the rider or rider and the mount. In the case of characters riding monstrous mounts, count the total unit strengths of both the rider and the mount. The chart below should be used to calculate the unit strength of each member of the unit:

Unit Strength
Type Unit Strength
Small; Medium 1
Large 2
Huge 4
Gargantuan 8
Monster +1

For Example: A unit of 16 elves has a unit strength of 16, as each elf has a unit strength of 1, and there are 16 elves (16 x 1 = 16)

For Example: A spider rider has a unit strength of 4, as its mount is large (unit strength 2) and is treated as a monster (+1 to unit strength), and the rider is medium (2 + 1 + 1 = 4). If the spider rider joins a unit of 10 spider knights, the unit will have a unit strength of 24, as each spider knight has a unit strength of 2 (large size), and the spider rider has a unit strength of 4 ([2 x 10] + 4 = 24).

CharactersEdit

The world is full of mighty heroes such as skilled fighters and powerful wizards. These extraordinary heroes are far mightier than the ordinary warriors that make up the majority of an army. Heroes lead lesser soldiers into battle and can turn the tide of even the most forlorn battles. To represent this, characters have their own special rules which are explained here.

The term "character" refers to all player characters (that is, all characters created using chapter 2 of the Player's Handbook). These rules also apply to captains and chieftains, except that they cannot leave the unit and are subject to the hope is lost! rule.

MovementEdit

Lone characters with a unit strength of 1 move as skirmishers, while lone characters with a unit strength of 2 or higher move as monsters (and are treated as monsters for the purposes of unit strength. Characters riding monsters move as monsters.

Characters can also join allied units. A character can be deployed in a unit at the start of the battle when the armies are set up, or can join a unit as the battle progresses. In order to join a unit, a character must simply move into base-to-base contact with the unit. The character is immediately placed in the front of the command company, displacing command models if nessecary (one normal model is placed in the back of the company, filling up a depleted company or adding a new company). This does not use up any movement. It is worth noting that the unit cannot move further than the character can (and visa-versa), so if a character with a speed of 6 moves 4" to join a unit, the unit can then only move 2", and must automatically expend the same action that the character used to move into the unit (usually a move action.

A character can leave a unit he has joined simply by moving out of it. The character can move from any point in the unit that you wish. This does not cost the unit any actions.

While a character is in a unit, that unit is immune to the hope is lost! rule.

ShootingEdit

A lone character shoots, and is shot at, as a single skirmisher. If, however, he joins a unit, he cannot be targeted by ranged attacks—ranged attacks against the unit he is in are instead made against the normal models in the unit. Area attacks made in the shooting phase that cover him in their areas of effect instead attack a normal model in the unit. While the character is in the unit, he may only shoot at enemies within the unit's arc of sight, and may only shoot if he is in the front rank of the unit. If he shoots, the other members of thew unit do not have to expend any actions, but if they also shoot, they must shoot at the same unit that he targeted, and visa versa.

ChargingEdit

A character can leave the unit in the charge phase by charging. This works like normal charging, and leaving the unit by moving, except that he must leave the unit from the position that he is actually in.

Close CombatEdit

If a character is in reach of an enemy in close combat, that enemy may always choose to attack him, even if he is in a unit. Members of a unit may split their attacks in close combat between a character and a unit, if they wish. If a character is slain, any excess hits made against him are wasted and do not displace onto any other models. These excess hits do not count towards combat resolution If a character is not in reach of an enemy in the charge phase or the close combat phase, he may not attack, but he may move to a position from which he can attack without expending any actions in the following move phase. A character does not automatically miss with his attacks if he rolls less than 8 on the d20 roll to hit, like other models do.

ChallengesEdit

In the close combat phase, both sides are allowed to declare challenges. Only one challenge may be made per combat, and the side with the initiative may declare any challenges first. If as challenge is made, the side that makes the challenge must choose a character invoilved in the combat to declare a challenge. The other side may choose to meet or decline a challenge, as destribed below. Note that a challenge is refused, no other challenges may be made for that close combat.

Declining a Challenge (Boo! Hiss!)Edit

If the challenge is declined, the side that made the challenge must choose a character in one of the units involved in the close combat. That character is placed in the rearmost company of the unit he was in, displacing another model in that company (which is put in his place in the front of the unit). No challenge is fought, and the (so-called) hero may not take any actions until the end of the turn. The unit he is in may not benefit from his presence in any way. It should be noted that if the character is fighting alone (including characters mounted on monsters) he may not refuse, as he has no "friends" to hide behind!

Fighting a ChallengeEdit

If the challenge is accepted, the character that accepted the challenge is move through the ranks so that the two characters are opposite each other (or at least within reach of each other). If you prefer, you may simply remove both characters from the combat and place them next to each other at the side of the combat to show that they are fighting a challenge. Note that if you do remove both characters from the combat, do not fill their place in their units with ordinary minions.

When the combat is resolve, resolve the challenge at the end of the combat. The characters cannot make any attacks against targets other than the other character, and no other models involved in the combat can target attacks against the two characters.

If a character is slain, any excess hits are wasted and do not displace onto any other models. However, excess hits made in a challenge do count towards the combat result, to a maximum of 5—this is called "overkill". Overkill represents the fear caused by seeing the unit's champion beaten to a bloody pulp before their eyes.

PsychologyEdit

When a character is part of a unit, if his courage check bonus is better than his unit's, the character's courage check bonus is used. In addition, if the character is fearless, immune to psychology or stubborn, his entire unit gainst that rule. If the character causes fear or terror, the unit he is in also causes fear or terror.

Action PointsEdit

Characters also have action points (AP), in addition to their other characteristics. In the game of D&D War, action points can be used for a number of things:

  1. To Modify Dice Rolls: When a dice is rolled on the behalf of a character (or the unit that character is in), such as an attack roll, that character can spend a number of action points to modify the dice roll by 1 per action point spent. It should be noted that, as rolling for the initiative is on the behalf of the entire army, and not the character, action points cannot be spent to modify the d20 rolled for the initiative, even by the general. It is also worth noting that action points spent in this way do not confer bonuses or penalties, they actually change the number rolled, so a dice roll modified in this way cannot be modified below 1 plus any bonuses or higher than the maximum roll possible. It is also possible to modify a d20 roll to be a natural 20 in this way. Using action points in this way does not count towards the maximum number of action points that can be spent each round.
  2. To Take an Extra Action: A character can spend an action point to take an extra action, as normal.
  3. To Grant a Unit an Extra Action: If a character spends an action point to take an extra action, his entire unit can take the extra action as well. The unit must take the same action as the character (i.e. shooting if the character uses the action to shoot), and cannot use this extra action to shoot twice or make attacks in close combat twice (including attacks made as part of the charge) in once turn.
  4. To Act First: A character can spend an action pont to allow him and his unit to act before the other side, even if the other side has the initiative. This does not allow the character or his unit to take extra actions, but it does allow him to, for example, charge before the side with the initiative can charge. If both sides wish to spend action points in this way, they must both roll off to see who acts first (all action points are still expemded, regardless of the actual result), with a bonus to the d20 roll equal to the character's initiative bonus.

Only one action point can be spent by each character per round, and each unit can only benefit from the last three uses of action points per round.


The GeneralEdit

One character in the army must be nominated as the general. Any character can be used, though it helps to choose the character with the highest courage check bonus. The general gains an additional action point. In addition, all allied units within 12" of the general can use the general's courage check modifier instead of their own (as if he was in their unit). Finally, if the general gains a power bonus or penalty to his initiative rolls from a power, that bonus or penalty applies to the army's initiative roll.

Recharging Encounter PowersEdit

If a character has expended at least one encounter power, he can attempt to recharge a single encounter power at the end of each turn. This is a standard action. Roll 1d6. On the roll of a 5 or 6, he regains the use of a single encounter power of his choice.

War MachinesEdit

War machines are huge engines of destruction that hurl massive projectiles into enemy units, and (hopefully) cause devavstation in the enemy ranks. War mackines include massive catapults and trebuchets (grouped under te term "stone throwers"), and huge crossbows (called "bold throwers") that fire massive crossbow bolts into the enemy ranks.

A war machine's unit consists of a single war machine and several crewmen. A war machine usually has between two and five crew, and the unit is deployed like skirmishers. This simply means that the war machine and crew must remain within 2" of each other at all times, unless the crew abandon their machine and flee.

A war machine can spend a double move to move at the speed of the crew's slowest member. War machine unit move as skirmishers. If any crewmen are slain, the speed of the unit is reduced proportionally (characters that join the unit can take the place of slain crew in this way). For example, an elven bolt thrower with two crew (speed 7) at the start of the battle looses one crewman. The crew's speed of 7 is therefore halfed to 3.5".

Characters that join the unit may not help the crew fire the machine, but they are free to shoot at a different target from the target of the war machine. Characters that have joined war machine units are not affected by misfires.

Reloading a war machine is a move action. If the crew are reduced to a single crewman, reloading a war machine becomes a double move action, however bolt throwers, with their simpler mechanism, are not affected by this rule, and always require a move action to reload. Firing a war machine is a standard action.

A war machine cannot charge. When a war macine is charged, the crew line up in between the machine and the charging unit before the charge is made. Otherwise, a war machine's crew are treated as skirmishers in close combat.

When the crew of a war machine flees, they will leave the war machine behind as they flee, becoming a seperate unit of skirmishers. Any allied war machine crew can become the abandoned machine's crew. The war machine and the crew become a new unit. A crew may also deliberately abandon a war machine to operate another one. A crew can abandon a war machine simply by moving away from the war machine.

Bolt ThrowersEdit

A bolt thrower is a huge crossbow that fires spear-sized bolts at enemies, each capable of spearing several warriors with a single shot.

The bolts fired by bolt throwers are ranged attacks, for example:

BasicMelee Bolt (Standard; At-Will) ♦ Weapon
+10 Vs. Reflex; 2d8 + 4 damage; make a secondary attack. Secondary attack: Previous attack bonus -2 Vs. Reflex; 1d6 + 4 damage; make a secondary attack. Keep making secondary attacks until you miss or until you hit 6 times.

When firing a bolt thrower, pivot the bolt thrower on the spot until it faces it's target, and then make the primary attack, as normal (including the minimum of 8 to hit). If you hit, make the secondary attack, but subtract 2 from the attack roll. Keep making secondary attacks (at -2 to hit each time) until you miss or until you hit 6 times. Note that the secondary attacks are only made against units made up of companies. You cannot make any secondary attacks agains non-company units. This represents the heavy bolt piercing through the ranks.

For example: A bolt thrower fires at a unit of goblin warriors (Reflex 13). The bolt thrower therefore hits on the roll of an 8+. If the bolt thrower hits, make a secondary attack with a +8 to hit. Repeat the attack at a -2 penalty each time (+10, +8, +6, +4, +2 +0), until you miss or until you hit 6 times.

Note that bolt throwers, unlike stone throwers, never misfire.

Stone ThrowersEdit

Stone Thrower Misfire Chart
Edit

1d6 Result
1 Destroyed! The stone thrower is destroyed and its crew slain as the machine is ripped to bits by the strain placed upon it.
2-3 Disabled: The stone thrower is damaged and cannot shoot until it is repaired with a standard action. In addition, one random crewmember takes 1d10 damage. Increase this damage to 2d10 at paragon tier and 3d10 at epic tier.
4-6 May Not Shoot: The stone thrower simply does not fire this turn. It may fire next turn, so long as it is reloaded.

A stone thrower is a huge engine of destruction that hurls massive rocks that shatter on impact, slaying many foes with shards of rocks.

To fire a stone thrower, rotate the model on the spot to face the chosen target—this is part of the standard action used to fire the machine. Then, choose any model of your choice within range that the stone thrower is facing. You cannot choose a model within 12" of the stone thrower, as the machine is too powerful to throw a stone such a short distance!

After the target has been selected, the stone scatters—a stone thrower, after all, is hardly a precision instrument! Roll 1d10 and a scatter die (a scatter die is a six-sided die with an arrow on four of the sides and a hit symbol on the other two sides). If a hit is rolled, the stone lands on the chosen target. If an arrow is rolled, the stone lands a number of inches away from the target equal to the number rolled on the d10 in the direction shown by the arrow on the scatter die. If a 1 is rolled on the d10, the shot is not fired (regardless of the result shown on the scatter die), and the stone thrower misfires. Roll 1d6 on the stone thrower misfire table.

Place a 1" diameter circular base on the point where the stone lands—this is the pint that the area burst is centred on. All creatures (friend or foe) in the area of effect are attacked by the stone thrower. Calculate the roll needed to hit as normal. From this point, the stone thrower's shot is simply treated as an area burst against all creatures in the burst.

Special RulesEdit

ArmiesEdit

For battle to commence, you need armies! This section contain rules for building armies of the age of war. It contains the basic stat blocks for the various armies of the age of war, which will be expanded on in later suplements, as well as rules for assembling these units into armies.

Building an ArmyEdit

Pts by Level and Battle Size
Level Pts by Battle Size
Small Medium Large Huge
1 3000 6000 9000 +3000
2 3750 7500 11250 +3750
3 4500 9000 13500 +4500
4 5250 10500 15750 +5250
5 6000 12000 18000 +6000
6 7500 15000 22500 +7500
7 9000 18000 27000 +9000
8 10500 21000 31500 +10500
9 12000 24000 36000 +12000
10 15000 30000 45000 +15000
11 18000 36000 54000 +18000
12 21000 42000 63000 +21000
13 24000 48000 72000 +24000
14 30000 60000 90000 +30000
15 36000 72000 108000 +36000
16 42000 84000 126000 +42000
17 48000 96000 144000 +48000
18 60000 120000 180000 +60000
19 72000 144000 216000 +72000
20 840000 168000 252000 +840000
21 96000 192000 288000 +96000
22 124500 249000 373500 +124500
23 153000 306000 459000 +153000
24 181500 363000 5445000 +181500
25 210000 420000 630000 +210000
26 270000 540000 810000 +270000
27 330000 660000 990000 +330000
28 390000 780000 1170000 +390000
29 450000 900000 1350000 +450000
30 870000 1740000 2610000 +870000

When building armies of roughly equal power, there are several points that you must decide on.

Firsly is the number of characters to include in the armies. Both armies should take the same number of characters of the same level. This is because characters are much more powerful than the various units in the army and can overballance an army if taken in excess, and charcters with a level distance can also overballance the game. In the case of battle fought as part of a regular game, both sides should have a numbeer of characters equal to the number of characters in the adventuring party, of thge same level as the characters in the party (for example, a party of 5 6th level characters should be fighting against an army including 5 6th level characters). In the case of battles played outside of a campaign, it is best to include three to five characters of the level of the battle.

Secondly, you must decide on the level and size of the armies. For battles fought as part of ongoing campaigns, chose a level equal to the level of the party, or a level within about four levels of the party's. For other battles, 5th, 15th or 25th level are good default levels. For the size of a battle, you can choose either small, medium, large or huge. If you don't have much time for a battle, small is the best size to choose. Medium is the best default size, and large or huge should only be selected if you have plenty of time to resolve the battle.

Finally, you can cross-refrence the size and level of the battle on the table opposite to find how many points you have to spend on the armies. Each army should have a number of points roughly equal to this value—it is acceptable to go a few points over this limit. One point is equal to one experience point, so you can include a monster (such as a troll or a dragon) from the Monster Manual for a number of points equal to its experience point value as a rare formationwhat units you can select; the char below shows how many formations of each type you can select. The number of common formations shown in the table is a minimum rather than a maximum; there is no maximum number of common formations that you can select.

Small Medium Large Huge
Common Formations 2+ 3+ 4+ +1
Special Formations 0-3 0-4 0-5 +1
Rare Formations 0-1 0-2 0-3 +1

Each unit has three points values shown, seperated by slashes (for example; 200/1200/6400 pts/comany). At heroic tier battles, use the first points value shown, and use the second and third values for paragon and epic tier battles, respectively. At paragon and epic tier, add 10 or 20 respectively to the initiative, defenses and attack rolls of the unit, or use the paragon or epic stat line if present. In the case of damage dealt by the unit's powers, three values seperated by slashes, as with points values. At heroic tier battles, use the first damage value shown, and use the second and third values for paragon and epic tier battles, respectively

Magic ItemsEdit


Magic Item Pts Cost by Level
Level Pts by Level
Heroic (+0) Paragon (+10) Epic (+20)
1 100 600 3200
2 125 700 4150
3 150 800 5100
4 175 1000 6050
5 200 1200 7000
6 250 1400 9000
7 300 1600 11000
8 350 2000 13000
9 400 2400 15000
10 500 2800 19000

In addition to units, you may select a number of magic items (2 for a small battle, +1 per size increase). These magic items, with the exception of the army's battle banner, cannot be assigned to characters; they must be taken by units. Note that any bonuses conferred to attack rolls, defences, etc, only apply to the model carrying the item, and are simply treated as +2 bonuses, regasrdless of the actual size of the bonus. Not that you must select the level of item that is closest to the level of the battle, so no selecting level 1 magic weapons in a 20th level battle! Magic items cost a number of points equal to those shown in the table opposite.

Finally, you can select a single battle banner. This costs the same points value as two magic items of the banner's level, but does not use up your magic item "slots" (i.e. it is in addition to the maximum number of magic items you can select), and it can only be carried by a character, even though magic items selected as part of an army cannot be taken by characters. Battle banners are simple magic banners with additional rules (as described above). Note that a magic banner taken in this way cannot be kept after the battle. If a character already has a magic banner, that banner may be used as a battle banner at the points cost of a single magic item of the banner's level.

CharactersEdit

Characters should be generated using the rules in the Player's Handbook, as normal, however, charaters gain a resilience score, attacks and action points, as shown below, as well as additional special rules based on their class. The magic items carried by characters are not counted towards the maximum number of magic items you can take in the army or the army's points value.


AvengerEdit


Pts/as character

Hero Circle1
Infantry Character
S I Hp R A AC F R W AP
Heroic Avenger 1 3 2
Paragon Avenger 1 4 3
Epic Avenger 1 5 4

Unit size: Individual



Special Rules: Armor of Faith, Avenger's Censure, Channel Divinity, Oath of Emnity.

Divine Assassin: If you are in base-to-base contact with an enemy unit that has the target of your Oath of Emnity power within it, you can make melee attacks against that target, even if the target is not in reach.


BarbarianEdit


Pts/as character

Hero Circle1
Infantry Character
S I Hp R A AC F R W AP
Heroic Barbarian 1 3 2
Paragon Barbarian 1 4 3
Epic Barbarian 1 5 4

Unit size: Individual



Special Rules: Barbarian Agility, Feral Might, Rage Strike, Rampage

Devastating Rampage: Once per encounter, when you use your rampage class feature, you can take a multiattack action to make basic attacks instead of simply making a basic attack.


BardEdit


Pts/as character

Hero Circle1
Infantry Character
S I Hp R A AC F R W AP
Heroic Bard 1 3 2
Paragon Bard 1 4 3
Epic Bard 1 5 4

Unit size: Individual



Special Rules: Bardic Training, Bardic Virtue, Majestic Word, Multiclass Versitality, Skill Versitality, Song of Rest, Words of Friendship.

Inspirational Leader: You, and any unit you are in, gain a +2 bonus to courage checks. In addition, you, and any allies within 6" of you have the stubborn special rule.


ClericEdit


Pts/as character

Hero Circle1
Infantry Character
S I Hp R A AC F R W AP
Heroic Cleric 1 3 2
Paragon Cleric 1 4 3
Epic Cleric 1 5 4

Unit size: Individual



Special Rules: Channel Divinity, Healers Lore, Healing Word, Ritual Casting.

Divine Litany: You, and any unit you join, can re-roll failed courage checks. You cannot re-roll this re-roll, and the second result must be accepted, even if it's worse.


DruidEdit


Pts/as character

Hero Circle1
Infantry Character
S I Hp R A AC F R W AP
Heroic Druid 1 3 2
Paragon Druid 1 4 3
Epic Druid 1 5 4

Unit size: Individual



Special Rules: Balance of Nature, Primal Aspect, Ritual Casting, Wild Shape.

Primal Fear: While in your beast form, you cause fear.


FighterEdit


Pts/as character

Hero Circle1
Infantry Character
S I Hp R A AC F R W AP
Heroic Fighter 1 3 2
Paragon Fighter 1 4 3
Epic Fighter 1 5 4

Unit size: Individual



Special Rules: Combat Challenge, Combat Superiority, Fighter Weapon Talent.

Mighty Defender: If you join a unit, the unit you join gains a +2 bonus to its AC.


InvokerEdit


Pts/as character

Hero Circle1
Infantry Character
S I Hp R A AC F R W AP
Heroic Invoker 1 3 2
Paragon Invoker 1 4 3
Epic Invoker 1 5 4

Unit size: Individual



Special Rules: Channel Divinity, Divine Covenant, Ritual Casting.

Icon of Divinity: You, and any unit you join, can re-roll failed courage checks. You cannot re-roll this re-roll, and the second result must be accepted, even if it's worse.


PaladinEdit


Pts/as character

Hero Circle1
Infantry Character
S I Hp R A AC F R W AP
Heroic Paladin 1 3 2
Paragon Paladin 1 4 3
Epic Paladin 1 5 4

Unit size: Individual



Special Rules: Channel Divinity, Divine Challenge, Lay on Hands

Sanctified Challenge: When you declare a challenge, it cannot be refused.


RangerEdit


Pts/as character

Hero Circle1
Infantry Character
S I Hp R A AC F R W AP
Heroic Ranger 1 3 2
Paragon Ranger 1 4 3
Epic Ranger 1 5 4

Unit size: Individual



Special Rules: Fighting Style, Hunter's Quarry, Prime Shot

Rapid Short: If you have the archer fighting style, while weilding a ranged weapon, you gain a an extra attack when shooting.
Dance of Blades: If you have the two-blade fighting style, while weilding two melee weapons, you gain a an extra attack in close combat.


RogueEdit


Pts/as character

Hero Circle1
Infantry Character
S I Hp R A AC F R W AP
Heroic Avenger 1 3 2
Paragon Rogue 1 4 3
Epic Rogue 1 5 4

Unit size: Individual



Special Rules: Rogue Tactics; Rogue weapon Talent; Sneak Attack.

Assassin: If you are in base-to-base contact with an enemy unit that has a character within it, you can make melee attacks against that character, even if the character is not in reach.
First Strike: At the start of each round of combat, you have combat advantage against any creatures that have not acted yet in that round of combat.


ShamanEdit


Pts/as character

Hero Circle1
Infantry Character
S I Hp R A AC F R W AP
Heroic Shaman 1 3 2
Paragon Shaman 1 4 3
Epic Shaman 1 5 4

Unit size: Individual



Special Rules: Companion Spirit; Healing Spirit, Speak With Spirits

Spirit Strike: When you take a multiattack action to use an attack power that doesn't have the spirit keyword, you can also use a single at-will spirit power once, in addition to the attacks made as part of a multiattack action.


SorcererEdit


Pts/as character

Hero Circle1
Infantry Character
S I Hp R A AC F R W AP
Heroic Sorcerer 1 3 2
Paragon Sorcerer 1 4 3
Epic Sorcerer 1 5 4

Unit size: Individual



Special Rules: Spell Source.

Magic Disruption: All arcane powers (other than your own) used within 6" of you take a -2 penalty to all attack rolls made as part of the power.


SwordmageEdit


Pts/as character

Hero Circle1
Infantry Character
S I Hp R A AC F R W AP
Heroic Swordmage 1 3 2
Paragon Swordmage 1 4 3
Epic Swordmage 1 5 4

Unit size: Individual



Special Rules: Swordbond, Swordmage Aegis, Swordmage Warding.

Arcane Shield: When you join a unit, all models in the unit gain the benefit of your swordmage Warding class feature.


WardenEdit


Pts/as character

Hero Circle1
Infantry Character
S I Hp R A AC F R W AP
Heroic Warden 1 3 2
Paragon Warden 1 4 3
Epic Warden 1 5 4

Unit size: Individual



Special Rules: Font of Life, Guardian Might, Nature's Wrath.

Mighty Defender: If you join a unit, the unit you join gains a +2 bonus to its AC.


WarlockEdit


Pts/as character

Hero Circle1
Infantry Character
S I Hp R A AC F R W AP
Heroic Warlock 1 3 2
Paragon Warlock 1 4 3
Epic Warlock 1 5 4

Unit size: Individual



Special Rules: Eldritch Pact, Prime Shot, Shadow Walk, Warlock's Curse.

Mass Curse: When you use your warlock's curse class feature, you can instead choose to curse a unit (so long as that unit consists of 2 or more models). When you take a multiattack action to attack a cursed unit, you can make an extra attack against that unit.


WizardEdit


Pts/as character

Hero Circle1
Infantry Character
S I Hp R A AC F R W AP
Heroic Wizard 1 3 2
Paragon Wizard 1 4 3
Epic Wizard 1 5 4

Unit size: Individual



Special Rules: Arcane Implement Mastery, Cantrips, Ritual Casting, Spellbook.

Quickspell: When you use the multiattack action to use a ranged arcane power, you can make an additional attack.



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